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Hurray!!! I finally have a bee hive with bees

 
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mischief
House Bee


Joined: 06 Nov 2013
Posts: 19
Location: South Waikato,New Zealand

PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2017 9:19 am    Post subject: Hurray!!! I finally have a bee hive with bees Reply with quote

I bought a chest hive from rather than make one. It was very close to what I was going to make so I thought I would start with this.

It has an observation window right along the rear wall, a hinged lid that has a peg to make sure it stays closed.
There are four inside covers so only 4-5 frames are exposed at any one time.

Ahem, I did opt for frames rather than top bars and there are 32 hofman deeps.
I did take off the foundation that they came with, well most of it. Every other frame has the top third still in place in the hope that this will make sure the combs are all straight.
It has a full mesh bottom with three sliding boards all squared up to do mite counts. I hope these will be enough cover in winter, not that it gets too cold here
I also made sure I got the robber screen because we have alot of wasps here. It has a bottom entrance on the long side and another smaller and higher one on the far short side, that I think is to do splits with.
Oh, and follower boards. Somebody/ies are pinching all your ideas!

I thought I was going to be able to pick up a nuc from friends, but this didnt happen. Then I thought I would wait and see if it would attract a swarm. That didnt happen either.

When I saw bees for sale on trademe, I decided to buy them now instead of waiting til next spring. I hope I havent left it too late for them to get established before winter. I know its only early -mid summer, but I dont know how long it will take them to get set up.

The last two days have been pretty rainy. In the dry spells they were out doing their orientaion flights. Today, its fine and alot of them have been out foraging. I saw some with pollen.

This observation window is magic. A couple of bees walked on the glass and I could clearly see the wax scales(?)

I was supposed to go down to Taupo to collect the bees, but when I was talking to the seller, he must have realised that I was a never bee(n) and said they would bring them up and help me install them.
That went really well, except, I am pretty sure he put the honey frames next to the end wall instead of the brood frames.
I am not going to open it up for a couple of weeks, but might have to turn the lot around so there wont be the chance of them getting stuck on the wrong side of the brood frames in winter.

His wife loved the window, but wasnt too sure about not having a queen excluder and very puzzled when I said I really didnt care if I didnt get any honey.

I am buzzing !!!!
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2017 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is normal practice to put honey frames at the sides in a frame hive, or at the back away from the entrance.

Let us know how you get on.
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mischief
House Bee


Joined: 06 Nov 2013
Posts: 19
Location: South Waikato,New Zealand

PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2017 6:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ok. so he has definitely put them in the wrong place.
As I understand things, I should not open the hive up again for at least two weeks from when they were installed, so I will wait til then to swop them around.
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AndyC
Scout Bee


Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 302
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2017 8:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If they are active and settled with a laying Q you may well find they have already moved the stores to where they want them . . . . . .
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2017 8:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As Andy says, they can solve this one themselves, if they regard it as a problem.
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