friends of the bees

This forum is funded by
Friends of the Bees.
It is free to everyone, and we would appreciate a donation from those who can afford it so we can keep it free for those who cannot.

UK beekeepers join now and benefit from £5M Public Liability Insurance FREE with membership. JOIN HERE


Natural Beekeeping Forum
low-cost, low-impact, sustainable beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 


Please Read The Rules before posting.

BOOK NOW
B=beginners I=intermediate A=advanced E=event more

INTERNATIONAL
* The Bee-Friendly Zone
* Natural Beekeeping online course
* UK, USA and CA Swarm Catchers

UK
* UK Natural beekeeping courses
* UK Natural beekeeping events
* UK Plants database
* UK DEFRA advisory info


FREE HIVE PLANS
* Phil Chandler - hTBH
* John Vendy - hTBH
* Warre hive plans


Share |
natural beekeeping forum rss feedRSS

Follow forum on Twitter

Join the BeeAlert email list for advance notice of events, courses, etc.
Barrel Top Bar Hive?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Horizontal top bar hives
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
SilentBuzz
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2008 6:24 pm    Post subject: Barrel Top Bar Hive? Reply with quote

Well I found this link http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/beekeeping/barrel-top-bar-hive/ and found it very interesting. You could even use wine barrels I would think. Wooden wine barrels would have less of a temperature issue. What do you guys think of this? I might even consider giving this a try!
Something else pretty similar...http://www.beesource.com/eob/althive/birkey/index.htm
Back to top
GarlyDog
Site Admin


Joined: 06 Mar 2008
Posts: 1719
Location: USA, Joliet, Illinois

PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2008 6:55 pm    Post subject: Re: Barrel Top Bar Hive? Reply with quote

Neat.

I think a wooden wine barrel would fall apart as soon as you cut it in half. But glue would solve that issue.

I thought the builders top bar frames were interesting. I'm not sure about the wire guides, but I like the bent wood idea.

In total, it look like a lot of extra work, but it might be fun to try anyway.

Thanks for the post.
_________________
Gary

This message was crafted using 99% post consumer electrons.

http://www.HiveCam.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
SilentBuzz
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Dec 25, 2008 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm yea. I would love to try this but I would rather not use the plastic barrel... and the bent wood hive does seem too much work.
Back to top
SamG347
Scout Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2008
Posts: 337
Location: USA, PA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 25, 2008 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ummmm what about just putting some 5 gallon buckets together....say 2-3....then cutting out the upper half of the buckets......I want to try this sometime in the future.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
SilentBuzz
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2008 3:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey thats a pretty good idea with the buckets! but the plastic is usually to brittle to cut through so i think it would just crack, right?
Back to top
il volpe
Guard Bee


Joined: 14 Aug 2008
Posts: 83
Location: USA, Colorado, Black Forest

PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2008 2:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My experience, those buckets will crack if you try to cut them with snips, but if you cut them with a saw it works okay except you must go very slowly or you'll heat it up with friction and it will melt on your saw-blade and gum it up, and then you will burn your fingers when you thoughtlessly attempt to ungum it while it's still hot. I was sort of amazed, since I was using a hand-saw.

I think the best barrels would be those heavy cardboard ones. Slightly better insulation, and the bees won't hate them so. They hate plastic.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SilentBuzz
Guest





PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2008 6:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cardboard barrels? thats a pretty good idea, but they would have to be water-proofed really well. Yea i would rather not use plastic. I just had an idea... what about those wooden troughs that farm animals eat out of? I'm not too sure about the dimensions, but they may be too big... just brainstorming.
Back to top
Walk
Foraging Bee


Joined: 08 May 2008
Posts: 120
Location: USA, Minnesota, Winona

PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a friend who made a plastic barrel TBH. The bees absconded - she thought it was because the white plastic wasn't entirely opaque and let in a faint glow of light. Also, it didn't breathe. You could use the plastic as a form for cob (straw/clay) construction. Intact barrels work great for rain barrels for garden watering, so it would seem a shame to cut them up for forms. If you had one the right size, you could work cob over the outside of the barrel without sacrificing its water holding potential.
_________________
Larisa
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
SilentBuzz
Guest





PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 10:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm really getting interested with these catenary hives, especially with the cardboard. Obviously cardboard cannot be waterproofed 100% but I could cover it with some linseed/ wax, and stick it under my shed, which has one side completely open. This way there won't be any water directly on the hive. Now, Its just a matter of choosing which size barrel to get. A family member of mine has a business that uses cardboard fiber barrels, so I could probably grab some from them for free to try this out. Very Happy Oh boy, I'm getting a tad bit excited now. Laughing Now before I jump into this does anyone have any opinions on why this may not work? Or anything?
Thanks for your patience with me, Rolling Eyes
Silentbuzz
Back to top
il volpe
Guard Bee


Joined: 14 Aug 2008
Posts: 83
Location: USA, Colorado, Black Forest

PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 12:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I used to keep one of those cardboard drums with the steel lid and bottom, out on the concrete front step. No roof over it, though it was against the outer walls on two sides. It was there for a couple years before it started to peel up 'round the bottom and I put a coat of exterior house-paint on it.

Of course, your milage will vary because I live in a dry climate, but I bet a cardboard-barrel-TBH on legs with a roof that had a considerable overhang would last suprisingly well with no coating at all. That dense cardboard fiber stuff doesn't act like a cardboard box.

You could design the roof and legs in such a way that when the drum started to swell and peel you'd just fix up another drum with the inner supports for top-bars, bolt the new drum to the legs and move everything else, combs, follower and roof, into the new drum. With a free source of drums, hey.

Disadvantages:

A half-drum on its side has got a bottom. But if you wanted the mesh-floor or no-floor of the classic KTBH you could cut a wideish gap in the drum and run a couple of bolts through on either side of the gap to attach another peice of drum with wing-nuts for the winter.

It's light. The wind will knock it over. In your shed, no problem. Out in the open you'd want to make the legs with little ring-feet so you could stake it to the ground.

Other than that, I see no problems. I bet the bees would like it and it would breathe just right for them. A basic design for one might be a nice boon for urbanish beekeepers in developing nations, too, as used drums can be salvaged from shipping ports and converting one into a couple of hives wouldn't require a lot of straight boards.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BBees
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 1:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SilentBuzz,

I think it's definitely worth a try!

You're probably a better judge of how well the cut cardboard edge will hold up after a number of inspections, but maybe attaching a length of 1"x2" along the cut edges for the top bars to perch on will help with the hives longevity. Just thinking out loud.

Good luck and keep us posted!
Back to top
SilentBuzz
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 2:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a good idea! I will do that! I'm just in the process of convincing my father that we need another unique TBH. Should be easy hehe. But for now I'm trying to help my bees over winter better... so I actually have bees in the spring. Shocked Laughing
Back to top
chaindrivecharlie
Golden Bee


Joined: 22 Apr 2008
Posts: 1213
Location: USA, Wisconsin, Sheboygan Co. Sheboygan

PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 2:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would use straight bees wax inside and out on the cardboard barrel. It will need good water proofing for rain and condensation. You will have to make one end out of plywood or something as strong. Should be an easy prodject, just needs a little tweaking.
_________________
 In HIS Serivce 
chaindrivecharlie

Florida Cracker
http://chaindrivecharlie.blogspot.com
http://www.Bikers4Christ.com  
http://www.fireproofyourmarriage.com


  
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
SilentBuzz
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 3:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

chaindrivecharlie wrote:
I would use straight bees wax inside and out on the cardboard barrel. It will need good water proofing for rain and condensation. You will have to make one end out of plywood or something as strong. Should be an easy prodject, just needs a little tweaking.

Well straight bees wax it is! Smile I just need to get my hands on some... I do have a bit from by hives... but not enough. And thank you for reminding me about the side! I totally forgot about that! lol Rolling Eyes
Silentbuzz
Back to top
il volpe
Guard Bee


Joined: 14 Aug 2008
Posts: 83
Location: USA, Colorado, Black Forest

PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 3:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think it'd definately need the wooden bars along the cut edge to support the top bars and to keep it from going all cattywumpus. It'd need two wooden ends if it's the kind of barrel that has metal ones, but maybe wouldn't need anything but another wooden bar on each end if it's the kind that has a cardboard-fiber bottom and lid.

Coating with beeswax'd be fun. Or, as some people do with wooden hive bodies, a combonation of melted beeswax and linseed oil painted on hot. But I still think it might hold up just fine if left alone, or at least would do here in Colorado. Be worth experimenting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BBees
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 3:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not having handled bees wax before (heck don't even have a bee yet), how is the best way to apply it to a surface like cardboard or wood?
Back to top
chaindrivecharlie
Golden Bee


Joined: 22 Apr 2008
Posts: 1213
Location: USA, Wisconsin, Sheboygan Co. Sheboygan

PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bees wax melts at 140 degrees f. brush on cardboard. You can use a double boiler for melting wax. If you are going to coat wood. Use a linseed oil and wax mix heated in a double boiler. Look into FAQ's on the exact mix ratio. You can buy a used double boiler cheap at a resale store.
_________________
 In HIS Serivce 
chaindrivecharlie

Florida Cracker
http://chaindrivecharlie.blogspot.com
http://www.Bikers4Christ.com  
http://www.fireproofyourmarriage.com


  
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
SilentBuzz
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you chaindrivecharlie, I was just wondering that myself.
ilVolpe- Why don't you try making one of these? Looking around the forums, it seems that you've recommended using the cardboard fiber barrels more than once. I think I'm going to wax the hive to make it last a bit longer.
Back to top
BBees
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks from me too!
Back to top
il volpe
Guard Bee


Joined: 14 Aug 2008
Posts: 83
Location: USA, Colorado, Black Forest

PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 6:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I should see if I have such a drum around still. May as well, if I do, but I think they've all got holes bashed in them from being thrown out of a barn-loft. It looks as if they're a little expensive to buy new in small numbers, at least compared to the salvage boards I've already got. I'm certainly keen, though, I think they'd be a better TBH than the \_/ shaped ones.

I haven't tried it but I've heard a 'Crock Pot' cooker thing is good for heating wax, and nice because it plugs into the wall so you can do your waxing in the garage instead of the frog. I see those at the second-hand shop more often than I see double-boilers. You want one just for the purpose, or so I'm told, because it's nearly impossible to get the wax off the inside.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Horizontal top bar hives All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Free ebooks from
Green Shopping

High Quality Top Bar Hives from Devon, UK

Constructed by an experienced carpenter from locally sourced, seasoned and sustainably-grown larch with oak legs. The standard measurements are: length 1m overall x 605mm overall width (roof) x depth 470mm (bottom of floor to top of roof) x height 990mm (ground to top of roof). The hive has a pitched roof, internal top bars and dividers and a stainless steel woven mesh bottom - (badger proof!) with a protective hinged wooden cover. The legs are oak for durability and are removable.

Price: £195.00 + postage and packing. Collection can be arranged. Ten pounds of this amount is donated to Friends of the Bees.

Bee Friendly Optional Extras:
Natural, organic oil/wax finish: £20.00
Larger hive - 1.2 m long: £20.00
Feeder shelf: £7.00

Natural weatherproof finish contains no toxic driers.

Call 07930285690 or email greyfieldtimber@googlemail.com

Also available: nuc boxes and portable/bait hives.
Please call for details


Anonymity Online
Protect your privacy. Defend yourself against network surveillance and traffic analysis
Tor Project
Protected by Anti-Spam ACP

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast


If the player misbehaves you may need the latest version of Quicktime.

You can listen to previous natural beekeeping podcasts and if you want to listen on your iPod, iPad or iPhone you can install the Barefoot Beekeeper app on iTunes. If you like it, please rate and review it!

Conserving wild bees

Advice from Jessie Jowers of the Bee Guardian Foundation:

All the research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

You can find out how to build homes for bumblebees or you can buy a ready-made bee house here.
Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)
friends of the bees

This forum is funded by
Friends of the Bees.
It is free to everyone, and we would appreciate a donation from those who can afford it so we can keep it free for those who cannot.

UK beekeepers join now and benefit from £5M Public Liability Insurance FREE with membership. JOIN HERE


Always have your stuff with you

2Gb free




Now available from Lulu.com

PDF format here


Now available from Lulu.com

Epub, Kindle, PDF and other ebook formats here

Buy The Barefoot Beekeeper A4 format printed edition from Lulu.com available worldwide

Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

Printed locally to you and delivered fast.

You can also order The Barefoot Beekeeper from your local book shop using
ISBN 978-1-4092-7114-7.

site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group list admin

View topic - Barrel Top Bar Hive? - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum

My Garden School Award
Bee swarms in South Devon collected free