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What type of bees?

 
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appshed
Nurse Bee


Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 43
Location: USA, Mts near Boone NC

PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2011 1:13 am    Post subject: What type of bees? Reply with quote

I am confused about what type of bee to get. I thought Russians were a better bet for the TBH, but heard that they are generally aggressive and not well suited for beginners(me). Someone recommended Minnesota Hygienic, but I read a beginner should never start with a Hybrid. Good grief.

What have y'all started with? I live in a temperate climate. I will not be using chemicals for mites.

Feedback much needed as I know I need to order SOME KIND of bee soon.
Thanks!
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Bush_84
Silver Bee


Joined: 09 Jan 2011
Posts: 802
Location: Brainerd, MN USA

PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2011 3:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I plan on getting carniolans due to them wintering better in the harsh Minnesota climate. If your weather is good I would probably just go with Italians.
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mmiller
Foraging Bee


Joined: 25 Feb 2010
Posts: 159
Location: USA Marysville, WA

PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am going with Carnies this year. Quite a few beeks in my area are happier with their overwintering capabilities.

Mike
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Bush_84
Silver Bee


Joined: 09 Jan 2011
Posts: 802
Location: Brainerd, MN USA

PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2011 9:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ya the guy in my particular area who seemed to be the best/most experienced keeps carnies. So that's definitely what I'm doing.
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bigbearomaha
Foraging Bee


Joined: 16 Sep 2009
Posts: 149
Location: Omaha, NE USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 12:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i say locally raised mutts.

1 they are adapted to your geography and

2 they are hopefully bred with "survivor" stock that has not been too thinned out
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DavesBees
Silver Bee


Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Posts: 564
Location: USA, Maine, Bucksport

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 3:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I second the Mutt Emotion.
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Tavascarow
Silver Bee


Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 962
Location: UK Cornwall Snozzle

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 7:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DavesBees wrote:
I second the Mutt Emotion.
Ditto.
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mmiller
Foraging Bee


Joined: 25 Feb 2010
Posts: 159
Location: USA Marysville, WA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 4:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mutts are great and I would agree that they can be the best way to go. That doesn't really help a new beekeeper. I had a hard time in the beginning finding local queens (mutts or otherwise) because I didn't know enough other beeks. Therefore I did like most new beeks do and started with packages and Italian queens.
I don't think telling a new beekeeper to use "mutts" is really helping them out all that much.

Mike
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Garret
Golden Bee


Joined: 04 Apr 2009
Posts: 1681
Location: Canada, BC, Delta

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 7:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Go with the ones that have the best mite tolerence. After a few generations they won't be the same mite tolerant bees but they will give you a good jump start at developing your own mutts.
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colobeekeep
Scout Bee


Joined: 27 Aug 2010
Posts: 286
Location: USA, Colorado, Denver

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you can get a swarm of local wild bees, or if they move into the wall of your house as mine did, that is a great option. You could sign up with a local bee club to be a swarm collector, so that you can try to get a local mutt swarm.
I believe the swarm that moved into the wall of my house might have carnis somewhere in their family line because of how docile they are and that they haven't used any propolis so far, but I can't be 100% sure. They were still a fairly small nuc when they went into overwintering mode, but they have done very well so far. (Another reason I believe them to be carnis.)
I'm new to beekeeping, so I'm definitely not an expert, but from what I've read in books and online I would order carnis because of how calm they are. It's a lot easier to work around bees that aren't agressive when you're new to the game. I can work around my bees without a bee suit and veil and not get stung. My wife has helped me on several occasions and she has never been stung. (She's even helped push bees back inside the hive when I've had the top off so that when I set the top back on none will get crushed.)
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recon
Scout Bee


Joined: 01 Dec 2009
Posts: 257
Location: England, herts, potter bar

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 11:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

can't give advice but i started with local swarms.. in baithives... DD
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bigbearomaha
Foraging Bee


Joined: 16 Sep 2009
Posts: 149
Location: Omaha, NE USA

PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 12:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have helped many 'newbees" get their start with local mutts, because I as somewhat (debatably) more experienced and having the opportunity, obtain numerous swarms and cutouts over the season.

A newbee getting in touch with their local club or association can very often make contact with someone who does the same, swarms captures and cutouts, or sign up for a list the club has, etc..

There is nothing wrong at all to suggest local mutts for new folks.

it can lower their initial start up cost by at least the cost of a pkg of bees, it can help them possibly be more successful with local survivors and it helps to keeps bees that might otherwise have been killed by exterminators alive and doing their thing.
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DavesBees
Silver Bee


Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Posts: 564
Location: USA, Maine, Bucksport

PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 2:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is my recommendation to any new beekeeper. I am going to assume 1 thing…you built your hive.
If you can build hive…
You can build a bait hive.
If you can build a bait hive ….
You can put one up.
If you put up a bait hive…
You might catch some bees.
What a great start for a new beekeeper!
Start running your mouth to anyone who will listen about your new hobby. If you are willing to do cutouts, tell folks that. If you would like to called for swarms, tell folks that. Hand out cards, go in the phone book, and notify your local fire department that you are a beekeeper. You may get a call and a free swarm….
What a great start for a new beekeeper!
Don’t believe for 1 minute that farm bees are the way to go unless you just want bees in that hive and you can’t wait. The best bees for a new beekeeper to start with are the local survivor bees especially if you want to be a natural beekeeper.
Otherwise I would recommend the man made Minhygaitaliacarnirussianbuckfas bees because …………………..etc, etc, was bread in or out of them.
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appshed
Nurse Bee


Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 43
Location: USA, Mts near Boone NC

PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, can I just use the TBH as a bait hive? I have lemon grass oil, wax, and 2 new hives. One hive is going to be placed near the house with the forest just a short distance away. We have seen fewer and fewer feral bees each year. That is one reason for jumping into Beekeeping.

It would be nice to save money and exciting to capture some feral bees, but I don't want to bite off more than I can chew. I am already concerned about my soon to be purchased package bees absconding.
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DavesBees
Silver Bee


Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Posts: 564
Location: USA, Maine, Bucksport

PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 10:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any hive without bees can be a bait hive but you will increase your chances with a piece of old brood comb in them.
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appshed
Nurse Bee


Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 43
Location: USA, Mts near Boone NC

PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2011 11:57 pm    Post subject: What kind of bees Reply with quote

Thanks everyone for your input! After much consideration, and still being quite confused, I have settled on Italians. That seems to be the most kept bee in my region and is what the local Bee-Keep Guy suggested.

I do want to try and "capture" a swarm someday. We are pretty far out (80% surrounding land is National Forest) so I guess my chances of seeing a swarm are not too good.

Thanks again y'all!
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RodneyWT1180B
Guard Bee


Joined: 20 Mar 2010
Posts: 91
Location: USA, WA, Centralia

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 3:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I went with Italians because the people I bought my package from told me that they were less likely to be aggressive than the Carniolians they also sell. I'm new I didn't know what to expect and I have a small back yard and neighbors on all sides so that was a major factor. I would love to catch my own, but I don't think I've ever seen a swarm in my area.
Like anything else, best depends on your specific needs.
Rodney
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Sir David
Scout Bee


Joined: 17 Dec 2010
Posts: 368
Location: france , angers

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Appleshed
Have you had honey bees in your garden last year ?
Is the National forest is a place they are likely to be living wild .
Get those bait hives out too Razz
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appshed
Nurse Bee


Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 43
Location: USA, Mts near Boone NC

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 12:26 pm    Post subject: Capturing Reply with quote

We see fewer and fewer bees each year, but they are there. I will put a small flower pot hive near the forest edge and see what happens.

Packages around here aren't until May. Very exciting prospect!
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