Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
Queen Rearing in a Single Top Bar Hive using a Cupularve

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Horizontal top bar hives
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Norm
Moderator Bee


Joined: 15 Jun 2007
Posts: 2974
Location: UK in winter, Sweden in summer

PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 8:40 pm    Post subject: Queen Rearing in a Single Top Bar Hive using a Cupularve Reply with quote



Summary
Condition cage
Put queen in cage for 24 hours
Release queen
Set up queenless section
Transfer larvae
Setup queen excluder section
Transfer cells to nucs
Check for laying queens
Unite duds

The colony chosen for rearing the queens should be a vigorous one, and the bees should be numerous enough to cover at least ten combs.

Calendar

Using the day the egg was layed as Day 0 (no time has elapsed)
Day -4 (minus 4)Put Cupularve cage in Top Bar hive and let the bees accept it, polish it and cover it with hive smell. Feed.
Day 0 Find Queen and confine her to the Cupularve cage.



Day 1 Release queen So she doesn't lay too many eggs in each cell.
Methods of Starting the. Queen-Cells. The best methods of getting the larvae in the cups accepted is by giving them to a section of the colony that has been deprived of its fertile queen and most of its brood in one operation from three to twenty-four hours.
Day 3 Setup cell starter section. Make the end section queenless by putting in a solid division board adding at least two combs of brood and make sure there is a VERY high density of bees. This is so they will want queens and so they have a lot of bees to care for them. Also make sure they have plenty of pollen and nectar.
Day 3½ Eggs hatch
Day 4 Transfer larvae in cups to cup holders on Cup Holder Bar and put it in starter section. The cups are hung between the two frames of brood. Feed the starter for better acceptance.
Day 6 The queen-rearing compartment can now have it's division board removed and a prepared queen excluder put in it's place.



Day 8 Queen cells capped
Day 13 Setup mating nucs Make up mating nucs, or hives to be requeened so they will be queenless and wanting a queen cell.
Day 14 Transfer queen cells to mating nucs. On day 14 the cells are at their toughest and in hot weather they may emerge on Day 15 so we need them in the mating nucs or the hives to be requeened if you prefer, so the first queen out doesn't kill the rest.
Day 15-17 Queens emerge (In hot weather, 15 is more likely. In cold weather, 17 is more likely. Typically, 16 is most likely.)
Day 21-24 Orientation flights
Day 21-28 Mating flights
Day 25-35 Queen starts laying
Day 28 Look for laying queens in nucs (or hive being requeened). If found (in nucs), dequeen hive to be requeened
Day 29 Transfer laying queen to queenless hive to be requeened.

Notes:-

Feed the hive 4 days before and during the eggs laying.
Introduce the queen (with candy for a foreign queen).
This method of queen-rearing does not require so large a force of bees or so much manipulation. The Top Bar Hive should be large enough to take at least fourteen Bars. To make the queen-excluding partition, an ordinary sheet of queen-excluding zinc is tacked onto a division board with a hole in it. It should fit close to the sides and floor.

This is a combination of methods including F.W.L. Sladen, Michael Bush, others and my own experience.

I welcome comment or suggestions, some of which I may take. Wink

Lobo Cool


Last edited by Norm on Mon Sep 07, 2009 1:34 pm; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for posting that, Norm - no doubt many people will find it useful.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gerryt
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2008 10:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is this system similar to the Jenter kit? I bought the Jenter one a while back and never got round to trying it. Would it be feasible to use it in a TBH given that a chunk of comb need cut out before it's fitted? Or maybe I read the instructions wrong! Embarassed

Cheers

Gerry
Back to top
Gary
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2008 7:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Norm

I was recently trying to figure a way to raise qieens and was on every supply site i could find trying to make the equipment this answered all my questions. Could you post it in seasonal tips it definatly belongs there!
Back to top
Norm
Moderator Bee


Joined: 15 Jun 2007
Posts: 2974
Location: UK in winter, Sweden in summer

PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2008 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Cupularvae or Nicot cage is very similar to the Jenter but I am not sure if the parts are interchangeable.


Here is my Cupularvae screwed centrally to the underside of an ordinary Top Bar. The other is the queen cell raising bar, narrower than a standard top bar with 10 fixtures allowing cells to be affixed and a hair roller style cell protector to be fitted if required. This hair roller cage can then be used an introduction cage with a candy plug in the bottom.



Gary, seems I cannot move this into another thread only another forum.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
deantn
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 2:09 pm    Post subject: The Beekeeper's Record Book Reply with quote

Nice looking way to do queen rearing. Going to have to try this way when Assoc I belong to gets their system equipment for queen raising.
Back to top
Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2014 5:29 pm    Post subject: Re: Queen Rearing in a Single Top Bar Hive using a Cupularve Reply with quote

Norm wrote:
Make the end section queenless by putting in a solid division board


Sorry this is a late reply I was just hoping to make myself some back up queens this year because i lost one because of a failing queen...

By solid do you have and access to the rest of the hive or just walled off? Last time I locked my bees in they lost a good supply of workers because of over heating...

Can I add vents in the follower board so they don't over heat or do they need to be walled completely off? Or do they have there own entrance in the side of the hive?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jumbleoak
Scout Bee


Joined: 03 Aug 2010
Posts: 295
Location: UK, England, Kent

PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2014 6:57 pm    Post subject: Re: Queen Rearing in a Single Top Bar Hive using a Cupularve Reply with quote

Invision wrote:
Sorry this is a late reply


Gotta love web forums. I admit to laughing at your (no doubt unintentional) understatement. At the same time, just by adding a post, this might help generate a useful reply - but not, I suspect, by the above posters.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2014 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I think I had an idea what he meant but solid board, because most of the hives in UK are side entrance. I have end entrances. So for me I will probably just add some vents in the follower board, then add a feeder at the bottom. Just wanted some clarifications is all. Didn't really expect anyone to reply... I'll see how it goes, Might just make another follower board with a cutout for a queen excluder and an insert for a solid board.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Norm
Moderator Bee


Joined: 15 Jun 2007
Posts: 2974
Location: UK in winter, Sweden in summer

PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2014 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's been a long time since I first posted this but it does indeed have to be solid in order that those bees within know that they are queenless. If queen pheromones can be sensed/passed to them it will not work!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2014 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So how do you allow them to leave that area? just drill a hole in the side for them to get out? I mean they are only in there for 3 days if by your experience but in just one day I lost about 200 workers to heat...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2014 9:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[There can't be many places where you get a response from a post made 6 1/2 years ago! Cheers, Norm.]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2014 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agreed,

But this popped up when i Googled "Nicot system queen rearing in top bar hive". So just thought I would ask.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Horizontal top bar hives All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - Queen Rearing in a Single Top Bar Hive using a Cupularve - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum