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Living in a bee house
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Sun May 10, 2015 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today the first swarm of 2015:


Used the swarm to strengthen some "weaker" hives:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKY3scPIMd8

White wax indicates a good flow.


Second and third super get worked.


Head down into the cell, delivering some honey.


Saw this one in the midst of a forest right next to the road. Nice.
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wangtjuk
House Bee


Joined: 22 Jan 2013
Posts: 17
Location: Denmark

PostPosted: Sun May 10, 2015 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hereby declare myself to be a student of you Bernhard.

What you have to say about the bees in this thread is truly amazing.

Never before have I read anyone with an understanding of the bees like the one you show us here.

And what a joy to see your beautiful photos.

Every post from you I read several times in order to really absorb your words.

Hope you will keep on sharing your understanding of the bees with us here.

My deep respect for your knowlege and beekeeping.

I would love to see you one day create your own school of beekeeping. Cool
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Mon May 11, 2015 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am just a poor bugger with some bugs that I love. Embarassed That's it. Don't overstate.

"Work is love made visible."
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon May 11, 2015 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

zaunreiter wrote:
White wax indicates a good flow.


Is that really the case Bernhard? I had thought that it depended what the nectar flow was from. I have observed the wax my bees make during oil seed rape season is much whiter than that during lime or rosebay willowherb and balsam seasons. I had thought this was to do with what was in the nectar as the honey is paler too. Is it just a matter of the volume of nectar available at that time?
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Mon May 11, 2015 9:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Later in the season the bees work and rework old wax. Hence the darker wax. That's all.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote















Trapping pollen. About 300 gram per day...whew!
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Broadwell
Foraging Bee


Joined: 22 Jul 2013
Posts: 122
Location: UK, Kent, High Weald

PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2015 7:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Bernhard,

Do you just use the pollen trap for a certain number of hours a day, and then leave it open for pollen to get in?

Thanks
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2015 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could leave the trap on permanently, because they get enough through the trap to feed the brood. But I don't.

I leave the pollen trap on for two days on warm sunny days. If it is cloudy only one day. Or the pollen gets to wet and spoils quickly.
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Broadwell
Foraging Bee


Joined: 22 Jul 2013
Posts: 122
Location: UK, Kent, High Weald

PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2015 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Bernhard.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2015 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Clearing beeswax by using a planting basket, lady's tights and a steam dejuicer.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPsXK2QuAYQ
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Fri May 15, 2015 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is going to be my new log hive. It is rotten inside naturally - a lightweight and fluffy insulation!


From the bottom.


From the top.






See how thick the bark is.
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Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Fri May 15, 2015 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now that I see your new log I think I just might shake a swarm into my old log hive never used (still waiting in the work shop to come into action). Will you place your horizontally or vertically?
Im still deciding... not sure. In Kenya they do them horizontally. In Russia vertically.

Will you place some support sticks inside or will you let the bees do it totally their way?
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Fri May 15, 2015 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vertically and I let them do their thing.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2015 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today I inspected the TBH quickly. The first comb right behind the entrance was a honey comb, with honey only. I put it into the honey section ogpf the hive in the back. Replaced it with an empty topbar. This way I can open up the hive from the front entrance next time. And inspect the broodnest. In the honey section the bees were hanging in thick clusters and drawing another two combs out.

The second comb - seen from the entrance - was mostly a drone comb.




Next combs workerbrood. Hive was filled with bees and all looked alright, so I closed up the hive again. Bad weather anyway, today. With wind, rain and chilling temperatures.
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ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2015 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Healthy looking bees, by your clothes it seems quite cool, where are you in Germany ? Keep the fotos coming.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2015 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, those bees sure are healthy. Building a lot of combs right now.

SlowMotion video of the drones' dancing in front of the hive despite the strong wind we have. Looks a bit psychodelic.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzYtlR1cSTM

I'm in the Northwest of Germany, close to the border to Netherland. We have mild days right now, but yesterday was an exception. Freezing cold, and cold rain. A one day cold snap.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1581
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2015 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bernhard, I'm really curious to know what your normal daytime temps have been and what you consider a cold spell? We are having a prolonged period of daytime temps of 12-15C with quite strong winds too. My bees are building up much slower than yours. I would guess I am still at least 2 weeks away from my first swarm and only saw my first drone out flying last week.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2015 10:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Day: up to 21 degree Celsius
Night: around 10 degree Celsius

That day we had 6 degree Celsius at nighttime and about 10 degree Celsius daytime. It felt even colder because of the winds.

Yes, even for Germany we are one to to weeks before the others. That is why the "lower Rhine are" is called "Northest part of Italy" jocosely.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1581
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2015 10:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, thanks. That makes me feel a little better!

By the way.... I love your use of the word jocosely! .... a seldom used word, even by people whose native tongue is English. I'm well impressed!
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2015 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

He he, just didn't know how to spell jokily right. Wink Joke-ily, Jokely, jokily...darn...
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1581
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2015 1:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Going to confess that whilst I recognised the word I wasn't absolutely confident that your spelling was correct, so I dug out the dictionary and checked it before I used it myself.

For your information the word more commonly used is "jokingly".... you probably knew that already though and you're just pulling my leg.

I definitely think jocosely should be "word of the week" and I'm going to try to fit it into a conversation just to impress people! It certainly worked on me Wink
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bees still fly into the canola although it is almost over.


An artificial swarm making an art performance. The Big Hand or...Give me five!




The only use for a veil: serving as a landing platform for the Bee Air Force.




Just found a Goat Moth (Cossus Cossus) caterpillar.


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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Fri May 29, 2015 9:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Moving the bees into the black locust!

Usually we don't have much luck with black locust here, because rain turns the blossoms into brown quickly. But this year is different. Looks good and the heavy smell of the blossoms lies in the air.














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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2015 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The bees found the black locust immediately and do go for it, rain or not.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKY3scPIMd8

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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2015 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bees in swarm fever:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTjIg7IV9cs

Catching a swarm with a honey bucket:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SXGtrkOd_g

How to get out bees of a swarm catching net:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUfguxPCkmA
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2015 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

About the use of the "swarm catching pipe".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lah_Ms53R6s

Called" Seifertsche Schwarmfangrohr in German after it's inventor Henry Seifert.

No ladder needed anymore for swarms in greater hights. Up to three pipe sections can be handled.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2015 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boxes are boiling with bees. The way it should be.



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Adam Rose
Silver Bee


Joined: 09 Oct 2011
Posts: 586
Location: Manchester, UK

PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

zaunreiter wrote:
About the use of the "swarm catching pipe".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lah_Ms53R6s

Called" Seifertsche Schwarmfangrohr in German after it's inventor Henry Seifert.

No ladder needed anymore for swarms in greater hights. Up to three pipe sections can be handled.


I need this badly. All my swarms go up into the trees in my garden or my neighbours. I have had two failed swarm collection attempts already this year. They have both been at least 10m up, in inaccessible places.

Do you make the pipe and the bag yourself ? Can they be purchased anywhere ? What are the dimensions of both ? How do you get piping that is both strong enough and light enough ?

You hung the bag as close as you could get it to where the original swarm was, I assume to collect the bees that weren't yet in the bag. How did those bees get into the bag ? The bag itself didn't look open to me.

Adam.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1581
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 10:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adam, the pipe is just a plastic drain pipe 4" diameter works well. It is a bit cumbersome to manipulate when the bees are a long way up, especially if you have to join two pipes as it appears Bernhard is using in the video clip.

The time I used it, a couple of years ago, I taped an old beekeeping hat and veil to the bottom of the pipe to act as a swarm catching bag. The other bees cluster on the outside of the bag and then you just shake them all into your hive together once they are settled. It doesn't matter that some are inside and some out, just that the queen is inside. It's important to invert the pipe once you have the majority of the cluster in there to stop them climbing up and out.

It is a really clever invention and I salute Henry Seifert for his wonderfully simple yet ingenious idea.

The sound of the bees falling down the pipe is the weirdest noise ever!
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Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 12:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bernhard (and others) what time of the day do your bees swarm usually? Many in Sweden say around lunch time all between 12-14h.
When your bees swarmed was it cloudy and cold or sunny and hot? Just trying to gauge when mine will do it. My hives are boiling with bees, soon they will explode. I decided to let them swarm and collect them instead of doing splits (but might do a split in case they dont swarm soon). Thanks
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