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Living in a bee house
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Sat Jun 27, 2015 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is how the brood combs look like in the lower brood box right now.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9QSpfk9Mq1k
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 2015 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Summer lime tree...


...in (almost) full blossom.


Leaves are sticky from the sugar running out of the leaves and blossoms.


But only few bees forage on the lime tree.


Many aphids can be found in this tree.


And ladybug larvae.


Silver lime trees don't blossom yet, needs some more time.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2015 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting enough, the cornflower nectar flow is still going on, although most blossoms faded out. The bees fly at the brown blossoms, which do excrete nectar at the sides of the calyx. You can see the nectar droplets with your bare eyes.

On this picture in the middle, a shiny spot - that is the droplet of nectar.


On the video you see the bees flying at brown withered blossoms.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RoAaK3ez9i4
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2015 5:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a heat wave coming next days. Using some match sticks under the inner lid, I create a small gap which allows the hot air to escape at the top. The outer roof is tilted.


Tilted roofs prevent the buildup of hot air under the roof.


A chicken watering gadget serves as a bee watering place.


Bees can sit on the pebble stones and have a drink or two.


Some leaves prevent the water from evaporation.


Additionally I opened the flight hole on each brood section, so the bees can vent there if they like.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2015 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Black berries blossomed at June the 10th, 2015. For two days there was lots of black berry pollen and that was it. Today the big surprise: supers were filled up to the rim with black berry honey! The taste is plain fantastic. Fruity taste, very fruity.





The stronger hives have filled three supers (approx. 36 - 45 kg) and urgently needed a fourth honey super which I gave today.

We ate the wild combs with the fruity black berry honey all day, straight from the hive, which was very freshening in the heat of this sunny day.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2015 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Things are doing well in the sweet chestnut, too.






Bees work the sweet chestnut blossoms and are flying like mad. Honey supers are flushing with nectar.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2015 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today I caught a swarm from a chimney.

The swarm wanted to settle down in this disused chimney.
View into the inspection chamber in the basement.


No new honeycomb to be seen.


Bees had been living in the chimney already.


Looking through the upper inspection chamber right under the roof - nothing to see, only individual bees. On suspicion I smoked the upper chimney.


Then an uproar in the inner courtyard (in the city). The Swarm!


The bees ride on the passenger seat. Bringing the bees home.


Here they were allowed to spend the day in the cool shade of an apple tree.


Rescue at the last minute. One of the residents - an elderly pensioner - already fiddled around with a hair spray and lighter: he wanted to burn down the bees.

Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJteAlzA-Zk
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luk_lak
Guard Bee


Joined: 06 Dec 2013
Posts: 85
Location: Isle of Dogs, London, UK

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 10:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, you rode with the bees free ranging on the box (not inside) in your car? Respect!

*******************************
Lukasz - Friendliest gardener in E14
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do this all the time. No problem.
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ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Windows open or closed ? Swarms only?
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Fri Jul 03, 2015 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Doesn't matter. Usually swarms, but also nucs and splits.

The watering place is well visited by the bees.


Airation of the hive is effective as can be seen by the missing bee beards. Instead bees forage on the sweet chestnut and lime trees.

See video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cC_HgbThM3Y

Regards,

Bernhard
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2015 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Checking a swarmed fixed comb hive for new brood.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBLGIVQJirE
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2015 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some more TBH impressions. Hive swarmed, not much honey has build up yet, new queen is laying a firm egg pattern though.









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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2015 9:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We cared for the summer forage, because noone else does.


A mixture from Borage, white and red clover, phacelia, marigold, corn flowers, malva, sainfois and: sun flowers.




We ate honey all day. From black berries, lime trees, sweet chestnuts and some more.






First time without veil for my friend Bircan.


A nice day out at the bees.
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heathervale
Nurse Bee


Joined: 19 Jun 2015
Posts: 27
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2015 1:45 pm    Post subject: How do you use a cast swarm to strengthen a weak colony? Reply with quote

We now have 3 cast swarms and depleted colonies. Can we simply shake the cast swarms back into the hives????
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2015 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The bee bee tree is about to blossoming.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQ2Z-VSSpWA
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many wasps this year.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2015 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bee tree Euodia, wonder where that name came from...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZ9tbnjE93g
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2015 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wasps, wasps, wasps...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTT7g2nEito

Too many of them. Already killed some hives. Those were smaller hives. The wasps don't attack the bigger hives...yet. In 2013 they did, late August. So be on the watch.

A dry July with no rain lets the wasp population explode.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2015 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bee bee tree...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Domsywdn8YI
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2015 6:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is how the hives look like just before I start preparing the bees for winter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mA_BjTQDoww
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Lizbee
Guard Bee


Joined: 24 Mar 2012
Posts: 84
Location: UK, North East England, Hartlepool

PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2015 10:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow Bernhart

Those combs, bees, grubs... They are beautiful, they look so healthy. Was there something particular you were pointing out on the combs?

I am going to get myself some better glasses as don't manage to see the eggs so well when I inspect. Don't inspect very often.
I have two colony's in KTBH's.

Thank you.

Liz
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Odisej
Nurse Bee


Joined: 10 Mar 2011
Posts: 40
Location: Slovenia, EU

PostPosted: Mon Aug 17, 2015 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Bernhart

Which race of bees are yours ?







Also I wonder if your hives are your invention ?




Thanks a lot.

Marko
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Aug 18, 2015 8:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most of my bees are Buckfast bees now, since they are very healthy by itself. No fiddling and pushing necessary. No inbreeding.

No. Not my invention. Just Gatineau hives, which were developed on the basis of Warré hives.
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Odisej
Nurse Bee


Joined: 10 Mar 2011
Posts: 40
Location: Slovenia, EU

PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2015 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

zaunreiter wrote:
Most of my bees are Buckfast bees now, since they are very healthy by itself. No fiddling and pushing necessary. No inbreeding.

Ooo ... I see.
Some of your pictures with a lot of brood in autom are now understandable.
But this is probably not 'original' Buckfast bee from Buckfast, England isn't it.
zaunreiter wrote:
No. Not my invention. Just Gatineau hives, which were developed on the basis of Warré hives.

Well you successfully disguised it Smile . Very nice hives.

I use similar hives last two years .






... quilt from Warre hive is also here:




... entrance(s) is hole




... seven frames (odd number is more natural than even)




... long frames in brood box




Frames are actualy our 'standard' AZ frame (460 x 260 mm).
Namely in Slovenia about 95% beekeepers are using AZ hive in which frames are in horizontal position ...







but I prefer vertical (for the sake of bees) so I just turned it for 90° :





'Super's' frames are half high but boxes are the same (brood box = 2 super).

I know that manipulation is stunted but one way or another I do not want to interfere into brood area and mix brood and honey (store)frames.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2015 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Care yourself for bee food and make fields of flowers - especially in the time the bees prepare for winter...

































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Lacewing
Guard Bee


Joined: 08 Sep 2012
Posts: 96
Location: Powys, Mid Wales

PostPosted: Mon Sep 14, 2015 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lovely to see these on a wet, autumnal Monday morning! Thank you.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Sep 22, 2015 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

End of September impressions:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNvlVjtjv6Q
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A wild bee hive in a wall surviving for years without treatments.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzhSjk-XSbc
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ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice video Bernhard, how long have the bees lived there? How was the colony discovered?
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