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The Beekeeper's Lament

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Beekeeping books: recommendations and reviews
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BoBnh
Foraging Bee


Joined: 20 Apr 2011
Posts: 230
Location: USA/New Hampshire

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 7:04 pm    Post subject: The Beekeeper's Lament Reply with quote

"The Beekeeper's Lament" authored by Hannah Nordhaus.

There is a review of the book on Boing-Boing:
http://www.boingboing.net/2011/07/15/the-beekeepers-lamen.html
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Benjaminkeith
Foraging Bee


Joined: 22 Apr 2011
Posts: 195
Location: Peoria Illinois, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 5:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wish they would have used a picture of a honey bee for the article. Looks like a very interesing book.
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BoBnh
Foraging Bee


Joined: 20 Apr 2011
Posts: 230
Location: USA/New Hampshire

PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I got a chance to read this book. It is an interesting story revolving around a large commercial beekeeper. There are a some niggling things stated here and there in the book that bothered me. A few that I can remember are (paraphrased):
-Drones die instantly after mating
-Beekeeping evolved from the skep to the topbar hive to the modern Langstroth hive
-Skep beekeepers killed all the bees in a hive to harvest honey
-Skep beekeepers always destroyed their strongest hives for harvest and were destroying their best genetics


Although drones have their reproductive organ and part of their digestive system torn out after successfully mating, they do not instantly die. Nature is not always kind. They may live for a few hours, or even a day or 2.

Skep beekeepers (and box hive beekeepers) typically used "drumming" (rapping on the sides of the hive over and over) and smoke to to drive most of the bees out of the hive, and then put the bees in another container, or let the bees join other hives. The few remaining bees and brood were often destroyed with sulfur smoke.

Other than that, it is an interesting story and is a good "snapshot" in the history of commercial migratory beekeeping in the USA.

Bob
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Gareth
Wise Bee


Joined: 29 Oct 2008
Posts: 3065
Location: UK, England, Cotswolds

PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

-Beekeeping evolved from the skep to the topbar hive to the modern Langstroth hive

Nope: Langstroth was replacing skeps. TBHs as we know them today did not exist then, neither the Warre nor the horizontal form.
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Gareth

http://simplebees.wordpress.com
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