Friends of the Bees
Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

THIS FORUM IS ARCHIVED AND IS NOW READ_ONLY. PLEASE GO TO THE NEW FORUM HERE

*** You will need to re-register ***

Please support Friends of the Bees

Wasp larva in my split?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Beginners start here
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
CSWolffe
Guard Bee


Joined: 10 Jun 2011
Posts: 67
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah

PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 4:51 am    Post subject: Wasp larva in my split? Reply with quote

So, my Carnies are doing great, getting ready to swarm, so I did a split about ten days ago(HTBh). A week later, I went in and inspected the split, and sure enough, they've finished off one of the queen cells I spotted.
But while I was poking around, I noticed in one corner of one comb right by the entrance, I see about a dozen or so random cells capped with what looks like wasp paper, and a few odd looking brood in that area. I did notice what looked like a paper wasp poking around the entrance a day or so after I did the split. I was unable to snap a pic at the time
Is there some kind of parasitic paper wasp in the Rocky Mountain region of the US that will sneak in and lay eggs, cuckolding the bees into raising their young? Do the wasp larva eat bee brood?
And how bad is this sneaky bastard? Dangerous to my bees, once their numbers are up?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CSWolffe
Guard Bee


Joined: 10 Jun 2011
Posts: 67
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah

PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2014 4:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No answers, huh?
Well, I phoned my cousin's fiance who is pursuing a degree in entomology, and she tells me it was most likely a cuckoo bee, which normally parasitizes paper wasps, and in this case was likely just taking the opportunity to dart in and lay a few eggs in a relatively undefended hive.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuckoo_bee
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1063
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2014 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting - never heard of that happening before!

I'm surprised the honeybees tolerate such bare-faced cheek, but maybe they don't regard it as a problem?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CSWolffe
Guard Bee


Joined: 10 Jun 2011
Posts: 67
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah

PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2014 3:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, this was a fresh split, low numbers, queen had not emerged yet. So they were not able to defend well against such intrusions.
She was quite upset I was unable to get any pictures, as documentation of such an event would be quite valuable to entomologists.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Beginners start here All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Quality Top Bar Hives by Andrew Vidler

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.