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Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Bee health: the treatment (or not) of bee pests and diseases
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susi385
New Bee


Joined: 19 Dec 2019
Posts: 4
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Thu Dec 19, 2019 2:13 pm    Post subject: Bee Reply with quote

How do you handle, if the bees seem to starve in Winter?
I am new to the business.
Thank you!
Susi
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BobTheBuilder
House Bee


Joined: 17 Nov 2019
Posts: 19
Location: Belgium / Waregem

PostPosted: Tue Dec 24, 2019 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I imagine it is up to the beekeeper how to handle it, but if you're sure they're out of supplies this is what I' do:

Put a pack of sugar-dough on top of the bars, if they eat it all you can replace it.

To process the dough they need water though!

Good luck. - don't make a habit out of feeding your bees to often! Better to start winter with enough stores for them to make it through!
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charentejohn
Foraging Bee


Joined: 26 May 2012
Posts: 127
Location: Central France - Charente

PostPosted: Sat Dec 28, 2019 10:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I remember seeing someone just put a bag of fondant on top of the bars / top board. They just cut out a small 4cm hole placed above the open bars. This video gives an idea (I can't find the original one I saw which was better) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcIKPdgAOAk a t 3:36mins in you can see what it looks like.
The idea is moisture rising softens the fondant and the bees eat their way to the sides.

I would buy a single bag of pre made fondant from a beekeeping supplier rather than make any as this is needed for a quick fix. They will take what they need. Someting like this https://www.amazon.co.uk/simonthebeekeeper-Keeping-Fondant-Feeder-Blocks/dp/B00FYS58JG I am sure you will have a local source.
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Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

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